Exhibition of costumes at Eken√§s Castle

Back in April a friend of mine (who just happens to be the tenant at a 17th century castle close by) asked if I would like to put some of my costumes on display.

Would I?
Of course ūüôā

We discussed back and forth for a while which ones to choose.
Then the planes got put on hold both due to our massive workload and due to the upcoming birth of my child.

In end of June we resumed the planing, and decided a date for her to come and collect the outfits.

So the day before, I went down in the basement and located all the bits and pieces for the 4 chosen costumes.
Then I got to work mending and ironing everything to get them all to look their best.

IMG_9953It’s hard work ironing 4 m of train.

IMG_9956Collected outfits Рsorted, ironed and ready to ship.

IMG_9955I also lend her my dress-forms.

The castle Ekenäs is a museum with several different styles of interior decoration (from 17th century until early 20th century), and we wanted the costumes to represent a wide variety of times/people. Or at least as much of a variety you can get with only 4-5 shown pieces.

Here are the ones we choose:

1880s evening gownIMG_5660

Displayed in the dining hall next to the old piano and beautiful set dining room table.IMG_9990

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1780s Flower Robe AnglaiseIMG_3585

Displayed in the living-roomIMG_0009

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1790s Gentlemans wool outfitIMG_1115-ok

Also displayed in the living-roomIMG_0010

1913s Walking-dressIMG_0614

Displayed in one of the bedroomsIMG_0015

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And 1880s underwearIMG_5851

Displayed in one of the master bedroomsIMG_0024

I went to visit the Castle the other day, and got to look at my costumes the way the other visitors did. It was quite fun to watch old ladies and children alike photograph and point at my dresses.
And I must say, they really added something to the room and their exhibitions.

2015 – A year in rerview

I’m a bit behind in posting, but here are a summary¬†of the items I made last year.

January:

I started the year with grand planes (pun intended) and made pannier for the first HSM challenge of the year – FoundationIMG_5811

And one snowy evening I cobbled together a fake fur hat to match my neck-stoleIMG_5188

February:

For Februarys challenge – blue, ¬†I continued with the winter theme and finished my Redingote which I¬īve started in the fall.IMG_5615

I also had the time to (start) and finish a 18th century maids outfit for the 3rd challenge РStashbusting.IMG_4587

Mars:

And while I was in the mood to clear out some stash I also made a “Little red riding hood” 18th century cape¬†IMG_4563

and a brown wool skirt for my sister.IMG_6203

April:

April came with spring, and I made a summery outfit for¬†“Lady Mary” and the – War and Peace challengeIMG_4861

I also made a 1860s blouse and  1850s silk bonnet for a summer event.IMG_6304IMG_6729

May:

In May I made a cotton blouse for the РPracticality challenge and then a skirt, hat and belt to go with it.IMG_6963

June:

In June I scrambled to finish my 1850s plaid summer dress in time for an event. IMG_7059

Then I had some fun designing and making a crazy 18th(ish) century masquarde costume.IMG_5079

July:

Almost all of July was spent on making this 17th century bodice (and skirt and accessories) for Isis wardrobes “Sew 17th century challenge”IMG_8019

August:

August is medieval month in our part of town so I made an 15th century Burgundian dress for my sisterIMG_8363

And used an old thrift store find to complete the -Heirlome challenge with a 1850s farmers dress.IMG_8518

September:

September, with its magical colors and a drawing to the forest, made me want to make an “Outlander” inspired outfit.¬†IMG_8724
And to make a stylish (yet autumn inspired) 1900s day dress for the Brown Challenge. IMG_8890

October:

For the Sewing secrets Challenge, I made a new skirt to my 17th century bodice (not yet blogged about) IMG_9531_resized

It was around this time my head finally caught up with my body and realized I was pregnant, and needed to slow the heck down.
And that¬īs exactly what I did – I closed the door to my sewing room, and have just now started to once again peak through the key hole.

And so my sewing year of 2015 ends in October.

I¬īt will be some time before I¬īm back to more regular posting and sewing (but I finally starting to dream of pretty dresses again) so hopefully I can show you some new stuff in¬†not so long.

 

*For more pictures and construction of the pieces take a look at the “Portfolio” page.

Past Brown Creations

This months theme for HSM/15 is “Brown”.

The Dreamstress whites:
it’s not the most exciting colour by modern standards, but brown has been one of the most common, and popular, colours throughout history. Make something brown.

I actually like brown.
It’s a great color that (in my opinion) accentuates almost any other color. Its softer then black and cooler then white¬†when making color combinations. Brown also comes in a lot of different shades from dark chocolate to golden and soft nougat. It’s also been a (more or les=) popular color throughout history.

Here are some of my brown pieces I’ve added t my historical wardrobe theses past years:

IMG_1375One of my favorite dresses is this 1780s robe a la Anglaise in a lovely flowery cotton matched with a golden petticoat and brown stockings.

IMG_02181850s lend itself great to the brown color pallet.
This walking dress in printed cotton makes an impact on everyone around.

IMG_0406The dress also comes with an evening bodice.

IMG_2004A photo from 1929 inspired this simple cotton dress, the brown boots and white collar ads perfectly to the authenticity.

IMG_5660Who knew a 1880s evening gown in brown could be so glamours. The light teal skirt, white gloves and the dark brown fringe perfectly sets of the nougat in the gown.

IMG_0657The same 1880s trained bodice, paired with leather pants and heavy duty boots, also works for a softer Steampunk style.

IMG_8728Simple rural 18th century woolen bodice in light nougat/dark beige perfectly matches the plaid in the skirt and the softness in the nature all around.

IMG_1115-ok18th century menswear in a wide spectrum of brown hues, with the coat as the obvious focal point, matched with golden/brown waistcoat and beige/brown suede breeches.

IMG_6202A simple white shirt made fabulous with the help of a nice brown 1990s woolen skirt and cola colored belt.

IMG_4587This dark chocolate 18th century skirt reads as black, but makes a softer contrast to the white apron and stockings then black. The bodice is actually yellow with purple stripes, but can very well be read as brown.

IMG_3444Dark wine paired with chocolate brown makes for a serene medieval picture.

DSC_0776Golden poly knit makes for a nice Egyptian masquerade costume.

I’ve also made several accessories to my costumes:
IMG_5188Brown fake fur hat, matched with bought fake fur muff and fox stole, worn with my 1900s walking outfit.

IMG_8039A 1660s (or any period really) fake fur stole/shawl.

IMG_1106Chocolate velvet sleeveless spencer, made to go with my yellow regency gown.

IMG_4160Velvet cape trimmed with fake fur and 1840s velvet bonnet, make for some pretty Dickensien winter picture..

pump-st√•Sometimes the simplest of items make a huge different, This 1550s outfit wouldn’t be complete without the brown apron.

What do you think of the color brown?

Heirlome dress – Photoshoot

Only minutes after finishing my new peasant dress, I packed it and left for my sisters house (and her birthday celebration), where we took a few moments to take some photos around the yard – which was the perfect setting for this dress.

I’m wearing: My new Heirloom dress paired with apron and head-cloth/shawl from my National costume, beige woolen shawl, knitted mittens, chemise, petticoat, bloomers and lace up boots.

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IMG_8569Photo: Elin Evaldsdottra

1850s Swedish Heirlome Farm-dress

Last months HSM15 Challenge was “Heirlome”, and as never inherited anything suitable and knew nothing about my ancestors I had some trouble deciding what to make for this one.

Basically, I could make whatever I liked as long as it heirs from Sweden.
Initially I thought about making another piece for my national costume Рlike the jacket, embroidered shawl or headpiece, but since time was short (starting 1 week after deadline) I decided to go with a more classic (and fast) alternative.
The 19th century farm girl.

dalsland4I love this pic of a girl in her finest clothes in front of her home. So refreshing an “real” from all the fancy dresses you see in fashion plates and preserved garments.

Since almost everybody in Sweden heirs from farmers, it seemed logical to assume that so did me and my ancestors.

I found this fabric, 3 m blue plaid cotton flannel, at an online auction site for a real steal of a price.IMG_8614

I used my 1840s fan-front dress pattern and cut the fabric down to scraps, carefully matching the plaids.20150903_183856_resized

Then I sewed the dress together.
I made it all in three nights, altering between the sewing machine and hand stitching before the TV, and unfortunately “forgot” to take pictures. The sewing was pretty straight forward, so really noting to write in dept about (read about my last dress like this here)

I did however change a few things, from the original green dress, like:
Using darts to shape the front bodice, instead of fixed gathers. IMG_8635Adding the bodice to the skirt as to make a “whole” dress, and switching the buttons for hooks and eyes.IMG_8638

The finished dress:
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Just the facts:

Challenge: nr 8/2015 – Heirlome

What: A 1850s working woman’s dress – As my ancestors might have worn.

Pattern: Self drafted about 2 years ago.

Fabric: 2,6 m of plaid cotton flanell, 0,5 m of white cotton lining.

Notions: Thread, hook & eyes, 2 m bias tape.

How historical accurate: So so, the look and fabric is plausible, but I sewed most of it on machine and put in some modern techniques. Maybe 6/10

Time: About 10-15 hours

Cost: About 150 Sek (22 Usd)

First worn: For photos September 12.

Final thoughts: Unfortunately I do not love this dress. I like the idea of it much better then the dress itself.
I’t came out a bit to big for me, and being made to work without a corset I feel a bit frumpy wearing it.

IMG_8583Accessorized with apron and head-cloth from my national costume

“America day – Those who Stayed Behind”

This weekend I attended the “American day” in a small village called Kisa.
The theme for the day was the Swedish emigration to America during the later half of 19th century, with a closer look at the Swedish society, clothing and food for all those who choose to stay behind (mainly the rich).

The old In (W√§rdshus) in Kisa hosted the day, and me and a group of volunteer ladies held the costume and fashion “show” including a presentation of 1850-1900s fashion.

The first thing we did after arriving was to set up our dress forms with fashions from 1850-1900s.
Unfortunately we ended up with way to many bustle dresses and lacked both 1850s and 1900s dresses.
We also totally lacked mens fashion.
Lesson learnt for next time I guess.

IMG_5221Our “Showroom” – you can see my 1900s S-shaped corset to the left and my 1850s corset, crinoline and bonnet to the right.

IMG_5330Accessorizes 

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After the “showroom” was set, and we all gotten into our chosen garb, it was time to meet the guests.IMG_5245Group pic (missing two of the ladies who came a bit later)

We were supposed to walk around chatting with the guest, but since everyone was seated listening to the orchestra playing we didn’t had the chance to present ourself, but just stayed in the background as to not disturb the musicians.

IMG_5278Sara is wearing her fabulous military inspired 1880s bustle dress.

IMG_5254Helena in yet another lovely bustle dress.

IMG_5303I went a bit outside the box and wore my Downton Abby 1914s dress.

IMG_5295Gossiping 1850s ladies…

When the music was over, Sara got to show the resemblance between the orchestras uniform and her dress.IMG_5284Twins?

Then we all went inside for our costume presentation.IMG_5304

Helena held a great presentation, illustration the past fashions using both the dressforms and us as mannequins.IMG_5310

Then it was time to get seated for the 1870s style dinner, made by the Ins own chef from an old recipe.IMG_5314Salue! Cheers! Skål!

IMG_5320This pic cracks me up – just look at Mauds face watching me play with my food…

After dinner the guests had a little bit of time to ask us questions and take our photos.IMG_5340Susanna posing for a guest.

Before it was time to head home we all decided to take the time to get some nice photos
(my sister joined us the whole day as a photographer)IMG_5349

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IMG_5362Group-pic

IMG_5365The obligatory crazy group pic

IMG_5383Sara and Helena in beautiful blue bustles

IMG_5395Barbro in lovely 1870s dress – I love the stripe work

IMG_5415Maud and Marie just cant stop laughing in their 1850s garb

IMG_5433Josefine, Susanna and me chatting about some scandalous things.

IMG_5430“No way! I’t was you…”

IMG_5434Lovely Edwardian elegance

Then it was time to pack up and go home…IMG_5444

I’m not super impressed with the arrangement of the event (no PR, no schedule and strange activity clashes),
but I’m definitely happy and thankful for all the lovely ladies who turned up in costume and high spirit to make the day a success.

IMG_5368That pretty much sums it up…
All photos by: Elin Evaldsdottra

The Day of the Big Crinolines (part 2)

Here comes the rest of the pictures from “The Day of the Big Crinolines” (part 1).

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As the day progressed we walked round the old town of Gamla Linköping, visiting small shops and gardens, taking lots of photos and buying some new stuff.

IMG_6950_zpsylgylebbMaud, in the sun with her new umbrella/parasol.

IMG_6963_zpss9mca16nMaria, with her Southern American flair.

IMG_6968_zpspbttdfzlFan fighting!

IMG_6971_zpsan5eysn1Ladies walking¬†of to the distance…

IMG_7000_zpsf8k5b5llSara of “A costuming Engineer” in her stunning new 1860s gown.

IMG_7008_zpssnolbt4j¬†Clara reading “the bible” in the shadows.
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IMG_7047_zpsyggjftd3I love the color and shape of Claras bonnet, and she matched it perfectly with the lilac in her dress.

IMG_7007_zpsmror4nbkOne giant skirt on the bench…
IMG_7050_zpsitylkd9b…four giant skirts on the bench.

IMG_7096_zps0svyljhbOh naughty! 

IMG_7097_zps55ommnbgLove this flimsy, of focus photo – that’s what¬†the whole day¬†felt¬†like.

IMG_7106_zpsng69pnzcPernilla and Denise in their lovely new cotton dresses.

IMG_7110_zpse1huickePernilla (in red) was my co-arranger to his event, and an angel at making everything work out perfectly.

IMG_7119_zpsajm1ysn8Such a great color on Denise.

IMG_7137_zps3jkouzcsI love the sheer fabric on Pernillas bonnet.

On the town square we ran into the patrolling policeman, and convinced him to join in some photos.
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20150613_154632_resized“Hm, you are very strange madam…”

When the shops closed (and the tourist headed home), we all went to the old times skittle-alley for some resting and playing in the shadows.

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IMG_7185_zpsfjtvuw9hBarbaras jacket are made out of a tablecloth, can you believe it.
The whole outfit looks so smashing.

IMG_7168_zpsvpkvdogjHelena’s playing ball…

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IMG_7182_zpsy3xhu9alStrike! Eh, No…

IMG_7259_zpspmzu8pprJust general fooling around.

Some of the guest devoted them self to reading “the bible” – Not really
(they’r watching the live streaming from¬†the royal wedding).IMG_7190_zpstcswkhxu

IMG_7208_zpsqxka5zcyGroup-pic – with some added and some lost through out the day.

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IMG_7240_zpsd4ewzssgNewlyweds РCongratulations again!

We ended the day with a nice dinner at an beautiful old restaurant next to were we sat.
The food and the company was great, but we were all a bit exhausted by the long and hot day.
Then it was time to say goodbye.

Hopefully we’ll be able to do this again next year.

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IMG_7255_zpsbtj0ms0iJust awesome!

***

I probably should have stopped at the crazy group picture, but since this is my blog/account of the day, I will also show you the les glorious pics from after we said our goodbyes.

At the buss ride home, hot, tired and sweaty, I encounter my other sister – all fresh and styled for a night on the town.
I just had to do a un-glamours bus-selfie. ¬†20150613_203506_resizedAfter a long day of¬†costuming¬†in the sun…

Once home I finally got to take the boots of, and take a look at my sad feet and socks –¬†the blisters will stay for quite some time I’d wold think, but mu bellowed stockings are¬†lost to all hope of saving.
20150613_212113_resizedGoodbye my friends, We had some good times together.
You could make any historical costume look better and would always stay in place (above the knee) even without garters.
I will miss you, and have a really hard time replacing you.

The Day of the Big Crinolines (Part 1)

So, it finally came – “The Day of the Big Crinolines”, that I’ve been preparing for all spring.

Stora krinolindagenThe Event poster made by Helena, using one of the pictures of my paisley gown.

The day was a collaboration with “Gamla Link√∂ping” and “Svenska 1800-tals s√§llskapet”.

As a¬†one of the¬†hosts for this event I’ve put quite some work into getting it perfect.
Together with Pernilla from “Fashion of the days gone by” I talked to “Gamla Link√∂ping” (the outdoors museum where the event was to be held) about help with publicity, booking the outdoors dance-floor and using their dressing-room among other things.
We had discussions with the historic dance team (to make hem do a dance show and a short dance course), with the “Historic costume group” for a fashion show and with several well read historic re-enactors for a small lecture on the fashion of the day.

At the end we only managed to get the dance team Рwho did a great job and was really appreciated by the participants of the day.
(Maybe next year we will be able to book some more entertainment and lectures…)

Besides planing the event itself, I’d worked on getting both me and my sister properly dresses.
Something I finished with just in time.IMG_7094 My sister is wearing her new 1860s ensemble including her blue Skirt, white Shirt, blue Hat and black Swiss-Waist, paired with a bridal petticoat, bloomers, stockings, lace up shoes, and black lace mitts. 
I’m wearing my new 1850s¬†ensemble¬†of plaid Dress, green silk bonnet, cage Crinoline, Corset, petticoats, bloomers, lace up boots and a clock in a chain at the waist.

The event was a big hit and lots of lovely people from different parts of Sweden joined in.
We even got our own full page in the local newspaper.
IMG_7331Yes, it’s me in the big picture – the reporters caught me of guard, and convinced me to both answer some questions and to pose for them. They even caught some of it on tape – read the whole article and watch the interview (in Swedish) here.

Enough talking, on to the pictures…

We started the day by gathering all the attendant at the town square.IMG_6857_zps0p4obyy9awaiting some more people…

IMG_6861_zpsosyyobjyPerfect lilac picture dream

IMG_6860_zpsrcjtpnodStaying cool in the sun

IMG_6862_zpskaq0xb4wA bustle at the Crinoline day was of course also welcome

IMG_6863_zpsmfo3vckrComing back from the interview (with the two reporters trailing behind).

Then we went to the outside dance-floor to talk a bit and to get to know each-other, since there was a lot new faces for all of us.  IMG_6865_zpsoqdi9hrdYou can see the reporters lurking in the background 

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IMG_6867_zpsvgjv4sh2Clara, Maria and Engla in three quite different styles of 1850-1860s dresses.

Then we went for a short walk to some greenery, to have our picnic lunch. IMG_6874_zpsz1rfhfzeEva, with her super modern fruit Рthe pineapple

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Then we headed back to the dance-floor to watch “Folkungagillets historic dance team” perform.
And for some of us – join in the performance…IMG_6884_zpsxffywhld

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Here’s a short film of one of the dances:

Then everyone was invited to join for a a few group-dances and some polka.

Afterwards, one of the dancers helped me take some pictures of my dress in the nice light of the dance-floor.IMG_6917_zpsgoaummcb

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One of the people who came to watch the public dance show was my friend Annica (who is an expert dancer) and I got to dance some polka with her. Yay!IMG_6924_zpsyd38oss6

IMG_6892_zps8zpctidwBustle glory.

After the dancing some of us headed of to get some cofee, or “Fika” as we say in Sweden.IMG_6926_zpszlw8kxaa

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And asked one of the photographing tourists to take our picture.
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IMG_6935_zpsqo7hrqghMy (quite dramatic) shadow

IMG_6938_zpsl8yupwpnVisiting some shops

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To be continued…

1850s Plaid Summer Dress – Photoshoot

Since I didn’t finish the dress until the night before the event, me and my sister took a few minutes away from the others to document my dress at the day itself.

I’m wearing: My new Plaid 1850s Summer dress (part 1, 2 & 3), green silk Bonnet (part 1 & 2), my cage Crinoline, 1880s corset together with chemise, petticoats, bloomers, stockings, lace up boots and a clock on a chain at the belt.

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IMG_7086_zpsh3pbcy38Photo: Maria Petersson

1850s Summer dress (part 3 – Bodice/finished)

Before I could continue on my 1850s dress bodice, I needed to decide on weather or not to do the gathers (part 1 & 2).

To help decide I posted the question n my facebook wall, and in my historic sewing class, and the answer was unanimous – Do the gathers.

With no time to argue, I got to work, testing the draping on my dressform.
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Using three gathering threads to test the draping on the dressform.

The shoulders being tamed and arranged by two treads of gathering stitches that later is to be hidden in the shoulder seam.
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I was not totally happy with the first try at waist gathers (using three threads) so I decided to re-do it using threads every 1-1,5 cm or so.
IMG_6763Testing the gathers.

Once I was happy with the technique I pinned and basted the lose front piece to the bodice, carefully matching the  tightness of the gathers to hide the darts.IMG_6767

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Then I pulled all the treads through and secured them on the back side, before I stitched the whole piece down using hidden slip stitches. IMG_6839You can see the right side being finished while the left still have all the threads hanging lose.

And then I left it for a few a few weeks, fully occupied by working on my sisters 1860s outfit, training for my big running competition and preparing for vacation on work.

Once I finished all the other things and finally gotten my (well deserved) vacation I once more took on the task of finishing the bodice.

With only one day left to work on the dress before it was to be used, I need to hurry.

20150612_105845_resizedThis is how I found the bodice once more the day before the event – When I decided to give it a try, and finish it.

With no time to lose, I pinned and sewed the sleeves together and added them to the bodice using gathering threads at the sleeve head, before turning under 1 cm and hemming them at the wrist20150514_125842Pattern matching the sleeves

Then I hand stitched the boning channels to the sides, back and darts, and inserted cable tie bones cut to the right length.

I added a placket to the front edge for the clouser, and pined bias-tape to the neck and bottom edge. IMG_6843

Turning the bias tape at the neck down and securing it at shoulder and back.IMG_6848

I stitched and turned over the bias-tape at the waist, and slip-stitched it to the inside lining to make a smooth and clean finish.IMG_6850 IMG_6852

late at night I marked the placement for the hooks and eyes, but I never had the time to finish them before I needed to hurry to catch the buss to the event.20150612_230034_resized(Instead I pinned it shut)

I also added bias binding to the sleeve edges

Outside and inside of the “finished” bodice:
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IMG_7294I didn’t had time to ad the clouser to the front (Edit: Now it’s done).

The finished dress:IMG_7261

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The Facts – Bodice & skirt:

What: A 1850s summer daydress

Pattern: I drafted my own using Janet Arnolds ” Pattern of Fashion” and Nora Waughs “Cut of Womens Clothes”.

Fabric & Notions: Thread, 5 m of light weight plaid cotton, 0,5 of regular white cotton, 1 m cotton tape for waistband, bias tape for boning channels & neck/sleeves/bottom edge binding, Boning, hooks and eyes.

Time: About 10-15 hours РI made most of the dress by machine.

Cost: 300 Sek – the fabric was on Sale and everything else came from stash.

Final Thought: I really love this dress!
I feel so pretty yet comfortable in it. I can move, dance and breath on it and even though it’s long sleeved it’s not hot at all, just perfect for summer.
And I did get lots of compliments at its first outing :-).

All that’s need to be fixed for next time¬†is, adding hooks and eyes for clouser and attachment bodice to skirt.
I also really need to re-set the sleeves. Well nothing is ever perfect ūüėČ
(I’ve now re- set the sleeves, added the hooks and eyes needed at the front and made the bodice and skirt sit firmly together)