18th century/Regency Dance recital

In the end of April my dance team attended a the local event called “dance week”, where teams and dancers from all genres in dance.

The theme was 18th century/regency and we all dressed in our favorite costumes. I wore my new regency Round Gown (which I only just finished that same morning…)

We had a short recital and then invited the on-lockers to participate for a few dances.

The whole event was pretty low key, with only a few on-lockers, but it felt good to once more dress up and move my ever growing body.

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IMG_6027Together with some of the interested public.

IMG_6118The whole team gathered.

Regency Round Gown – Construction

Long time no seen.
I´ve been living in my bubble for the past couple of months, but I have been creating some small tings while taking a break from blogging.

In the beginning of April, I got into my head that maybe I should join the dance team for one last performance before my time was due.
The recital was a 18th century/Regency themed one, set to April 24 (two weeks from then) – and I had nothing to wear.

You would think I’d be able to use one of my regency dresses (with lots of space for my growing belly), but unfortunately some other parts of me had grown as well (yes I´m talking to you, boobs), and there was no way I could close any of my old dresses.

So, a new one it is…

I’ve long been planing to make a regency/transitional round gown, and this was my chance.
Not only would it be perfect for accommodating my growing belly, but later it would also work as an “easy to access” nursing gown. Perfect!rd10

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I used the pattern from “Cut of Womens clothes” as a guide for the draping and seam placement, and the “Laughing Moon” wrap front spencer pattern for the front bodice foundation.
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As usual I drafted the pattern and made a mock-up.
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Due to my growing belly, I could not use my regency stays, but trusted a modern sports bra to do the work – after all for this project comfort was a priority.

Once happy with the fit, I when’t through my stash and soon found exactly hat I was after – a beautiful flower viscose in different shades of blue. And the almost 2 m of it would be exactly enough to make the dress.
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I cut the lining in a lavender blue satin (also from stash) and began the assembly.IMG_9601

All the seams in the back melts together from the print, but I do like the structure it gives to the bodice non the les.
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Once the back pieces was ready, it was time to get working on the front.IMG_9615Draping the front pattern

Using two gathering treads, I collected and arranged the fabric at the shoulder and under bust seamIMG_9622

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Before and after gathering the width.

Once the basic shape was done I tweaked it a bit by raising the under bust seam and removing a few cm from the neckline.IMG_9630

I stitched the lining using darts for bust shaping, IMG_9609

and basted the lining to the outer fabric.
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Then I added the sleeves and skirt.IMG_9640 The first look at how it might look once done (skirt just basted at this point).

I tried the dress on, and it fitted like a (very soft and unbelievable comfortable) glove.
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IMG_9655Tiny belly showing…
All that remained was to add ties and buttonhole for clouser and to hem the dress.

But before I could take the dress out for a spin (literally) I needed to make myself a skirt to match, to prevent any mishaps in the “underwear showing through the front opening” category.

Said and done.
I cut two widths of the same lavender fabric and stitched them together.
I pleated the top to a waistband, added shoulder straps, clouser and finished it by hemming.

The finished skirt/petticoat:IMG_9661

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The finished dress:IMG_9669

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IMG_9682Back shoulder

IMG_9683Ties in the back

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Sneak a peak from the photoshoot;IMG_6187

Outlander Photoshoot

As soon as the last piece was finished, I took my new “Outlander” costume out for some photos.
My fiance helped me, and I must say he did a splendid job both photographing and keeping up the good cheer.

I’m wearing: My new 18th century woolen jacket & skirt over stays, petticoats, bumpad and chemise. And a modern knitted shawl, linen cap, knitted mittens (which where gifted to me by the lovely Helena – Thanks again, I love them) and a basket for accessorizes.

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18th century Outlander Garb

After studying the various looks of the character Clare in the series “Outlander”, comparing them to the fabrics from my stash I decided to go for the simple laced up jacket and skirt that’s became symbolic with the series.4714dc59393b6c63c5000f447531e4c3

I started by making a skirt out of some plaid wool I found in my stash (which I’ve bought on sale about a year ago).IMG_8618

The construction is really simple, since it’s basically two widths of the fabric sewn together and gathered to a waistband.IMG_8623I used some linen scraps for he hem facing and hooks and bars to close the waistband.

The finished skirt: IMG_8646

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Then I started on the bodice.
Using the pattern from the yellow caraco jacket, only changing the front to accommodate a stomacher instead of button closer, and adding a peplum at the bottom edge.

I used some leftover beige wool for the jacket, interlining it with some linen scraps and dark green wool for the stomacher – all made to match the plaid of the skirt.20150906_105227_resized

It went together pretty fast even though I made it completely by hand.IMG_8629

IMG_8628The peplum being attached.

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Trying the jacket on my dressform.

I attached the lining made from two different pieces f left over cotton sheets. IMG_8640

Then it was time for the eyelets to be made, using a separate fabric strip attached hidden under the boned front edge.20150919_183851

The finial thing to make was to ad channels and boning to the stomacher.IMG_8685

The skirt and jacket ready to be packed for the photoshoot. 20150920_125242

The finished outfit/jacket:IMG_8657

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Just the facts:

What: A 18th century jacket and skirt.

Pattern: The jacket is my own draft (yellow Caraco jacket), and the skirt is just two rectangles stitched together.

Fabric & Notions: Skirt – 2,2 m plaid wool, thread and hook & bar.
The bodice: 1 m beige(left over) wool, 1,5 m white cotton for lining and interning, m cotton cord, thread, buttonhole thread, 60 cm plastic boning.

Cost: Everything came from stash but 300 sek would be a fair calculation.

Time: Pretty fast for a complete hand made costume – about 20-25 hours for the whole outfit.

Final thoughts: I really like this outfit. It’s warm and cosy and I really enjoyed wearing it for the photoshoot.

The “Outlander” outfit:IMG_8652

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Outlander dress inspiration

This past year I’ve followed the fenomen of “Outlander” with interest.

I’ve watched the series, read the analysis and discussions about the costumes, and smiled at the world wide drooling over Sam Heughan.
And of course admired all the fabulous recreations of the clothing’s from the show.

But it wasn’t until recently I found myself dreaming of my very own highlander/Clare costume.
It started late august.
I was going through my fabric stash for some creative impulses, when I found a piece of lovely plaid wool, in shades of dark green and navy, that might be just enough for a full skirt.
And there, right beside, a piece of perfectly matching left over beige wool that wouldn’t be enough for anything more then a small jacket, perhaps 18th century…
Yep, you see where I’m going here.

So onto Pinterest I went:

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355cff34b471477934399d8c8a14a566One of few back views

113df6a2fa677ee4eb31bb5ccaf5f374Close-up showing the hooks and bars that keeps the stomacher in place.

c26db7014bdcad3b3995e84fc3b1a71bAnd you got to love the cosy knitwear.

Plastic Fantastic Purple Flower – Photoshoot

Even though I could’t attend the ” Plastique Fantastique” event last weekend, I still took the time to dress up for a  photoshoot.

I’m wearing my new Plastic purple flower dress, pair with a purple synthetic wig, high stockings, black Kensington shoes accessorized with fan gloves, jewelry and feathers. Underneath I wear my old 18th century corset, short bloomers and pocket hoops.

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IMG_5170Doll Antoinette

IMG_5212Photo: Elin Evaldsdottra

Plastic Purple 18th century Flower Dress

The inspiration was wast for the “Plastique Fantastique” and afters some sketching I finally decided on a model I wanted to make.
20150628_164537_resizedJacket/Caraco and skirt combination.

Then I took a plunge down the rabbit hole that’s my fabric stash and came up with the perfect purple and flower combination – all in fabulous polyester plysch.20150628_164508_resized

10943917_10205707664432491_8962928573096592053_nTest drape to determent if the design would work.

As I’m really un-used to work with stretch fabrics I made a quick mock-up. 20150628_184932_resizedSome tweaking and it will work just fine.

Then I cut the pieces for the bodice from the flowery fabric.IMG_7451

I used my serger to assemble the pieces.
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The sewing went so fast and easy it I was bound to run into trouble…
As I discovered at the first fitting – The bodice is way to short.IMG_7461I guess the turquoise fabric I used for the mock-up must have been a two way stretch while the my plysch only stretches horizontally.

Since I had only small scraps of fabric left I decided to piece it. And to cover the edge with a belt…
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Perfect!

I finished the bodice by pleating the peplum at the sides and attached it, trimmed the sleeves with some plastic lace and decorated the front with purple ribbon bows.

To make the belt I cut a strip of the purple skirt fabric, pressed some interfacing on it and stitched it closed. Then I attached he plastic belt buckle to it.
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To finish the ensemble I stitched the purple plysch into a tube, a drawstring at the waist, and cut a shaped hem (to accommodate for the pocket hoops).
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The finished skirt (worn over pocket hoops):IMG_7871

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As the final touch to my costume I bought a purple clown wig.afroperuk-lila-1

The finished Dress:IMG_7874

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The Facts:

What: A 18th century inspired masquerade costume

Pattern: I drafted my own, using jersey pattern templates.

Fabric: 1 m flowery polyester plysch, 1 m purple polyester plysch, 0,5m white ply lace, 1m purple fake velvet ribbon, thread and a plastic belt buckle.

Time & Cost: Nothing – Everything came from stash. If new perhaps 150-200 sek (20Usd) (wig – 100sek [16Usd])

Final thoughts: I love it! Even though I had some trouble (Guess jersey’s not my kind of fabric) it came out really well. My only concern is the right side tipping of the skirt (and the fact it’s really short)

Preview:20150630_114250_resizedMy final fitting with wig and jewelry.

Plastique Fantastique – inspiration

This spring, some of the most awesome historical nerds I knew posted an event on Facebook called:

Plastique Fantastique!

And described it as a meetup/picnic for everyone who’s tired of the whole “Historical accurate” discussion:
“Trött och ängslig att du inte är HK? Har du innerst inne närt en dröm om att bära den där fantastiska Marie Antoinetteskapelsen i vit glansig nylon? Nu kan du kasta korsett och siden! Klä dig i polyester och kardborrband!
Välkomna till Plastique Fantastique!”
(“Tired of worrying about Historical accuracy? Do you dream about that awesome Marie Antoinette gown in shining polyester? Lets throw away the corset and the silk! Adorn yourself in Poly and Velcro!
Welcome to Plastique Fantastique!”
10931471_10152688327264372_9050406982234957925_n(Yep, the text’s all about ironic, and humor)

Since I love all the quirky and crazy side of costuming as much as the hand finishing, of course I wanted in.

A quick googling gave me overloads of beautiful (if not totally historical accurate) versions of the 18th century.
Enjoy!

Lets start with the o so lovely masquerade costumes:
girls_aloud_-_cant_speak_french18th century Halloween costumes – because nothing says 18th century like short skirts and high heels…
(also, read my rant on over sexulized female costumes here)

images (2)Who can resit a purple polyester perm?

1403sexysuperdeluxemarieantoinettecostum“I’m a 18th century pirate wench” (in gold lame and pink…)

34632You just got to love the lovely polyester shine…

6317955-mid-adult-women-in-18th-century-style-dress-woman-century-queenDoes she have a table under that skirt?

marie-antoinetteOh, that’s one way to use grandmas curtains…

18-century-dress-5875693Gold and bows – what can go wrong?

Then there are some fine examples of movie costumes:fantomens-stjrna-i-rsa_57494828Stage costume from “The Phantom of he opera” (2004) – It’s got extra everything! I love it!

087918th century Velvet and gold through 1950s eyes.

And couture:images (6)John Galliano for Dior fall/winter 2000/2001

And dress patterns:79_1simp_marieChange the fabric, remove the zipper and make he stomacher detachable and you do get a pretty good looking 18th century gown – but for now It fit perfectly for my purposes

Then there are the ones that’s more like beautiful art pieces then costumes:Marie-Antoinette-in-Paris-325What is that marvelous material?

1520797_387418951435365_8312075050876152832_nI just got to have those lips!

10917033_387418898102037_1681442576664186359_n“Mm, cake…”

misssisterrosevioletfacebookPastels, huge hair and heart shaped mouches – whats not o love?

167336_1541549979585_4685664_nSaucy…

Fuyu-Corset-1-bd“Ops, I forgot my dress” (so beautiful)

aab1bdf17a21312e28ca6d57bb422c7a“It need some more height, don’t you think Monsieur Léonard?”

tumblr_mq3nfm701p1ri8bwro1_500Lady in (hair)distress

PRIChESKA-pod-parusomGhostly beautiful. Is that paper?

largeCrinoline pirate

marie_antoinette_garden_gown_1_by_johanna449-d41pqs3And Asian styled Antoinette

a557012d57e6302990b71825d96e6669The Kraken!

originalShip ahoy!

orig-11834371“Let them eat cake!”
I need to try this sometime  – any volunteers?

dior18thcenturyCouture (clearly influential by Sofia Coppola…)

tumblr_n2qpfp8KID1qbukmqo1_1280Promo pic from “Marie Antoinette” (2006)