Regency Apron – Photoshoot

For the photos of my new apron I wanted to try to copy the inspiration print s much as possible, and since I haven’t made the rest of the outfit, I picked some pieces from my existing costume wardrobe that would some what give the right look.

I’m wearing my white regency evening gown, regency stays, cap, fichu, mittens and a few different hats and bonnets (like my green silk 1860s, brown velvet 1840s) for props.

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Behind the scenesimg_2436

1860s silk bonnet (part 2) – decoration

Continuing on the 1860s green silk bonnet:

To get my bonnet to look like my inspiration it needed a bit more work (part 1 – making the bonnet)

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To make it go from this to this

For the trimmings I cut stripes of “whatever left of the silk” and gathered them by hand to get a nice and “poufy” trim. IMG_6617

I also made a few flowers using scraps of the fabric. IMG_6710These are so easy to make and takes really no time at all.
I only wish I had more fabric to make more.

I then pinned the trimmings to the bonnet and stitched them on by hand, one by one until I was satisfied
(or ratter until I run out of scraps to turn into trim…).IMG_6619The first trims pinned on.

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The Finished Bonnet: IMG_6712

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The Facts:

What: A 1860s bonnet

Pattern: Lynn McMasters “1860s civil war bonnet”

Fabric: 60 cm of green silk taffeta, 30 cm of green cotton for lining.

Cost: 350 Sek

Time: A lot – about 30 hours.

Final Thoughts: I think it came out really pretty, with enough decoration to look right for the period yet being pleasing in my modern styizied eyes.
I can’t wait o wear it.

1860s – silk bonnet (part 1) – making the bonnet

After the mandatory inspiration searching, were I decided on a style of bonnet to make, I got to work,

7a42b6b21b6ade8740f6dc978540db72Inspiration

I decided to drape my own pattern using thin cardboard, pictures and millinery books.IMG_6244

After some fiddling and pinning I got a pattern for a bonnet…IMG_6233Which looked like a total disaster…

No, this would not do, time for plan B.

I ordered Lynn McMasters “1860s bonnet pattern” and started all over again.IMG_6342

After copying the pattern I cut it out in buckram.     IMG_6339

To get a better view of how the bonnets shape, I pinned the pieces together for a better look.IMG_6346

After trying it on, I decided to cut a few cm of of the brim.IMG_6349

IMG_6370Marking the pieces

IMG_6373Sewing the millinery wire to the buckram pieces.

Then the pieces was ready to be stitched together.

To get them to line up perfectly I taped the together before I sewed.IMG_6429

IMG_6433Back piece stitched to side piece.

IMG_6468A pretty nice buckram frame

Then I stitched bias-tape round every edge to keep the corners smooth underneath the fabric.IMG_6472

Finished frames:
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Then It was time to buy some fabric – deciding on green since that was one of the few colors in the store that would work with my dress (plaid white/blue) without being to obviously matching. IMG_6364

IMG_6366The cut pattern pieces.

As directed in the pattern I also cut cotton bating and some scraps of light green cotton for lining. IMG_6358

Before the fabric was to go on I needed to glue/stitch the batting on te frame to get an even smoother under layer for the silk.

Sadly I forgot to take pictures of this step, but basically I just glued around the edges of the frame pieces and carefully attached the batting to it.

Then it was time for the outer fabric.

(bad at photographing here too – I was working late at night, and didn’t had the camera on hand)

But I started with the crown, working downwards, basting all the edges and the carefully stitching the fabric pieces together.IMG_6580

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IMG_6574Silk all stitched on.

Then it was time for the lining.IMG_6589Using a curved needle to baste the crown to the inner corners.

Stitching the fabrics together using small invisible stitches.IMG_6591

Before finishing the last piece (the gathered front) of the lining, It was time for the “curtain”/neckpiece.IMG_6593I basically just gathered a straight piece of silk and pinned it to the curved neck of the bonnet.IMG_6596Then I stitched it on.

Then I gathered, pinned and stitched the last piece of lining to the inner brim of the bonnet, and added some silk ties.IMG_6598

The base for the bonnet was now finished, and all that’s needed was the decoration.
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IMG_6613I think it looks stunning and was a bit hesitant of even adding trimmings and decorations.

To be continued…

1860s (ish) bonnet – Inspiration

After finishing my 1860s blouse I needed to make myself some suitable headwear, so I started searching for pretty bonnets online.
And found lots of gorgeous ones (many way out of my skill level to re-create) in several different styles ranging 1850-1867.

Staw bonnets:
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Fabric covered bonnets:26f329ca64f5ff4266ec7a97f3cf469b

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Sheer bonnets:1341ba1eddbd4fe80ee80a2f707f944e

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Shirred Bonnets: f222ada3e114e2f52479aee3ab95fb90

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7a42b6b21b6ade8740f6dc978540db72This is my main inspiration for my bonnet.

(one hour before) The Regency Photoshoot

If you are like me, the night before a planed photoshoot is somewhat (ehm) hectic.
And this time was no exeption.

The night before my sister was to come to help me take some shots of the latest project, my HSF regency west, I scrambeled to get it finished and getting all the hooks and eyes to line up correctly. I did finish and manadged to get almost the usual amount of sleep that night.

But the late finishing of the west left me with not near enough time to finish the accessories to compleat the outfit.

So the first ting I did, after getting home from work and while the curles in my bangs coled of, was to get my new regency bonnet to decide on some decoratin design.

IMG_9609I bought the bonnet fron Neheleniapatterns about a month ago, but havn’t had the time to trim it.

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I found this picture on internet and really liked the design.hämta

I pinned some brown velvet ribbon in a simular way, and stiched it into place.IMG_1024

Unfortanly the trimming design would have benefitted from a wider and softer ribbon.IMG_1023Altough not perfect, it would suffice for this shoot (I will just have to re-do it for next time)

The other thing I’ve decided I wanted to compleat my outfit was some long sleves to turn my regency evening gown into a daydress.IMG_0979I grabbed my pile of white fabric scraps and was just about to give in up to time preasure (after all I didn’t had a pattern, and my sister was to arrive any minute for the photoshoot) when I found this…IMG_0981..Lying in the middle of the fabric pile was a pair of pre cut white sleeves.

There was no time to hesitate, or to get the measuretape to decide if they would serve or not, so I quickly sewed them togeter an dbasted them into the arm holes of the yellow dress.
I was fully about it when my sister showed up, so I sett her to help iron the skirts and collecting the final pieces from all around the house and basemet.

Then she helped me get dressed (and digging under neath my skirts to tightening the corset to the maximum since I manadged to make the west about 2 cm to smal).

Then, just when we where about to stepp outside the door, I decided that the new sleeves where to short to look good. The 3/4 lenght only made the ensamble look costumy and un-finished.IMG_1059So I asked my sister to grab the siccors and help me get rid of them.

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Just a normal day on the (costuming) job…IMG_1132

Bonnets and a Bergeré

This spring/summer have been quite intense regarding sewing for me. And as every costume requires it’s own special headwear I haven’t just been making clothes this spring – there have been quite a lot millenery going on as well.

And since The Huge Picture Hatt alredy got its own post, I thought it was time to show a bit more about some of the other pieces of headwear I’ve been doing/re-doing this summer.

Lets start with the 18th century Bergere.

You might remember it from last year (when I made it from an regular sunhat).IMG_2593

This is how it looked when I found it in my big hat box, and decided to make some changes to it.
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So I un-picked those green pieces of fabric inside the hat (I put them in last year to get something to attach the hair pins in, but it does work better to just push them through the hat).

Then I stitched on some metalic wire at the edge of the brim, and covered it with white bias-tape.
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IMG_7892Then I re-trimmed it with a plain green twill-tape.

And this is how it looked when I wore it with the brim tured up, at the big historic picknic.IMG_8785

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Next up is a  regular straw hat that I’ve turned into a regency bonnet.IMG_7073

I folded the hat in two, made a mark where to cut, IMG_7879

and grabbed the scissors. Make sure to stich the rows down before you cut, so the hat dont un-ravel.IMG_7880

Then I stiched on metal wire along the cut line, and covered it with bias tape.IMG_7889I used white bias tape at first , but decided to change it to a  nude tone twill tape instead, to make it more inviseble.

IMG_8656Close up of brown/nude twilltape.

The un-trimmed hat.
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Then I pinned on some white lace and a big flower brosh I had in my stash.

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IMG_8657Altough it does look pretty, it looks a bit too costumey for my taste.

So I re-trimmed it using another piece of lace and some leftover ribbon from my yellow regency gown paired with a black brosch. Much better.IMG_9198

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And here is how it looked worn togeter with my yellow regency dress.IMG_9132

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And finaly a 1840s bonnet made from skratch.

I used the same pattern (and tecniques) as my brown velvet bonnet, only cut it a bit smaler to get a slimer model for this bonnet.

I used thick canvas and super stiff  interfacing as the inner layers. And a white striped cotton voile for fashion fabric.IMG_7870

Before sewing anything togeter I stiched wire to all the pieces.IMG_7875

It was a bit tricky to sew inside the hat piece.IMG_7882

At least I only broke one needle…IMG_7887

Then it was time to start the hand sewing.  IMG_7890I attached the “lid” and covered it with fashion fabric.IMG_7900Then I stiched on the brim and more fashion fabric (no pictures sorry). And finaly I attached the lining on the inside.

At this stage I was ready to throw it out, it looked so terrible. The fabric was puckering and nothing I did would make it lay flat. I did a final try and decided to trim it to see if that would make it look any better.

It is fantastic what some pieces of lace can do to a domed project. It does actually look presentable.IMG_0454

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An this is how it looked this weekend when I wore it for a photoshoot.IMG_0207(You even get a sneak a peak of my next HSF project)

Regency dancing recidal

This past weekend, I joined up with the local historic dance group for a regency dance recidal. The city celebrated “The day of Dance” and we were invited to perform some of our dances.

I wore my new yellow regency gown – which I just finished the same morning.And combined it with a new straw bonnet, fishu and white evening glowes.

The weater was sunny and everybody had dressed to the teeth in their finery.IMG_9083I love Annas parasol – one day I will own my own.

IMG_9081Clara and Anna posing prettily with shawls and staw baskets.

We spent some time walking around the city, awaiting our turn to enter the stage.IMG_9111

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IMG_9090Me and Calle awaitning our turn in the heat. I was glad I didn’t needed to wear one of those thick wollen frockoats.

Then it was our turn to enter the stage.IMG_9094And since I’m pretty new to regency dancing I can’t tell you the name of the dances (and seartanly not tell them apart in photos), so we will just have to pretend to know whats going on.

IMG_9093Gentlemen in the middle.

IMG_9104Premiere doing a center cross.

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“Sellingers round”IMG_9101

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Since we were uneven, at least one lady had to rest, and sometimes more depending on the dance.IMG_9098

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“Jenny pluck pears”IMG_9099love the elegance in my pose in this picture…

When the dancing was over we meet up for a quick summer goodbye, before we hurried of in different directions.

IMG_9087Some of the dancers from our group posing for the turists (and my camera).

My dress hold up suprisingly well, and I feelt rater good in it. I think it will have more outings in the future.

It was such a lovely event and perfect day, I didnt even thought about the sun baking my nose and upper arms all day – well, I did descovered it later that night though…
(I will never attend a costuming event without proper sunscreen again).

 

1840s bonnet (Gratetude)

As my entry for the HSF Challenge 23 Gratetude, I decided to make a 1840s bonnet.

This desicion was made based on multiple things: I wanted to make something I never done before in a tecnique I never tried, and keeping myself outside the comfort zone.

And I think the early Victorian headwear are both pretty, interesting and would provide a suitable challenge because of the millenery parts.

I also really need to make myself some 1840-1850s headwear to wear to an upcoming event.

This is what I whant to accomplish.

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I found this great and informative blogpost on how to make a bonnet by Susan Biscoe. This post gave me the curage to give it a try.

So I started by draping a pattern.

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I used the left-over velvet fabric of the Masquerade cape, and started to cut the multiple layers.

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All the pieces cut out. From left to right: Velvet, cotton lining, interlining, intefacing and the pattern piece. (I later decided to only use one layers each of the interlining and interfacing).IMG_3836

Using a sick-sack stich to attach the wire to the pattern pieces.IMG_3842

I used a plier to bend the wire into shape.IMG_3846

All wired brim piece.IMG_3851

The crown being attached.IMG_3855And the inside.IMG_3864

Sewing the velvet to the crown.

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And finished with the trimings attached.

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Just the facts:

Challenge: 23 – Gratetude

What: A 1840s bonnet

Pattern: I draped and drafted my own.

Fabric: 0,4 m of: brown cotton velvet, brown cotton lawn, heavy upholstery fabric and 0,2 m of golden satin.

Notions: Thread, heavy interfacing and steel wire.

How Historical Accurat: The shape is pretty good but the construction and sewing are modern, even though it is mostly hand sewn.

Time: 10 hours.

Cost: About 100 Sek (11 Usd)

First worn: Not yet, but will be on dec 16th for a 19th century Christmas party.

Thanks to: First of all I whant to thank the whole costuming comunity, and all the help and support you can find there. You are all great!

A special thanks goes to Leomoni of “the Dreamstress” who got me interested in historic costuming, and through the HSF made me inspired to continue to make historic clothes this past year.

Then I whant to thank Susan Briscoe for the great blogpost who made it look so simple (to make a bonnet) and thous gave me the currage to give it a try.

Last thoughts: I really loved making this bonnet and are already thinking about making an other one. Mabye I should venture deeper in to millenery…